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The Islamic Republic last month handed out prison sentences totaling 109 years to six White Wednesdays campaigners to break our movement against compulsory hijab. In this fight, both the hard-liners and reformists are united against the women.

Saba Kordafshari, an energetic and optimistic 20-year-old was sentenced to 24 years in prison. She received 15 years for removing her hijab in public and another nine years for “spreading propaganda against the state,” and “assembly and collusion.”

“It is inhumane and extraordinarily cruel to sentence women who only removed their hijab as part of peaceful civil disobedience to these long prison terms,” said Masih Alinejad, founder of White Wednesdays campaign against compulsory hijab. “For Islamic Republic, it seems unveiled women are more dangerous than armed criminals and drug dealers. But the regime has failed to break the spirit and tenacity of Iranian women who continue to resist these oppressive laws.”

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I had the honor to open up the world premiere of “Women Warriors: Voices of Change,” concert performed by Orchestra Moderne NYC & the talented Amy Andersson. I spoke about the struggle of women around the world & especially the women of Iran who have been unjustly jailed for 10 years just for singing solo or resisting forced hijab.

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White Wednesdays activist Saba Kordafshari, 22, was sentenced to a total of 24 years in prison by the Tehran Revolutionary Court for demanding an end to compulsory hijab laws.

The trial was held on August 19 and the court’s ruling was delivered to his lawyer, Hossein Taj, on Tuesday, Aug. 27, according to Hrana news site.

Kordafshari was sentenced to 15years in prison on charges of “spreading corruption and prostitution and walking without a veil.” She received 1.5 years in prison on charges of “propaganda against the system” and 7.5 years for “collusion against national security.”

Korkdafashari has been under arrest in Tehran’s notorious Evin prison since June 1.

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Human rights lawyer Giti Pourfazel, one of 14 women who had signed a public letter calling on the Islamic Republic’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to step down, has been arrested.

In the letter published August 5, the 14 activists, who all reside in Iran, had called for a transition towards a secular democracy in Iran as a way to remove the “gender apartheid” and “patriarchal approach” that is practiced in the Islamic Republic.

In interviews with media outside Iran, Pourfazel condemned the systemic discrimination against women, which includes compulsory hijab and a ban on women to attend football matches. The issue has again become hot in the country after the international football association FIFA has reportedly given a deadline to Iran to stop the practice and allow women unfettered access to stadiums.

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