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Their bravery is awe-inspiring. Despite the risk of getting arrested, these women openly opposed the compulsory hijab in Iran. Their names Yasaman Aryani, Monireh Arab-Shahi and Mojgan Keshavarz.

Imagine being jailed for defending the most basic freedom: Freedom to choose what to wear! Elsewhere in the world, these women would have been celebrated for their commitment to women’s rights and feminism.

But in Iran, authorities have sentenced them to years of prison and they are being treated like criminals. As the world is presently grappling with the coronavirus pandemic, let’s not forget about these brave souls who are languishing in prison. Because freedom is not free.The international community should not turn a blind eye to the situation of these women. When female politicians visit Iran and submit to the compulsory hijab (under the pretext that it is the “Iranian culture”), they are also justifying the authorities’ repression of Iranian women. After all, compulsion has never been part of Iranian culture. Rather, it is the hallmark of a repressive and authoritarian system called the Islamic Republic, which has killed tens of thousands of Iranians fighting for freedom.

#WhiteWednesdays #MyStealthyFreedom

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The Islamic Republic last month handed out prison sentences totaling 109 years to six White Wednesdays campaigners to break our movement against compulsory hijab. In this fight, both the hard-liners and reformists are united against the women.

Saba Kordafshari, an energetic and optimistic 20-year-old was sentenced to 24 years in prison. She received 15 years for removing her hijab in public and another nine years for “spreading propaganda against the state,” and “assembly and collusion.”

“It is inhumane and extraordinarily cruel to sentence women who only removed their hijab as part of peaceful civil disobedience to these long prison terms,” said Masih Alinejad, founder of White Wednesdays campaign against compulsory hijab. “For Islamic Republic, it seems unveiled women are more dangerous than armed criminals and drug dealers. But the regime has failed to break the spirit and tenacity of Iranian women who continue to resist these oppressive laws.”

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White Wednesdays activist Saba Kordafshari, 22, was sentenced to a total of 24 years in prison by the Tehran Revolutionary Court for demanding an end to compulsory hijab laws.

The trial was held on August 19 and the court’s ruling was delivered to his lawyer, Hossein Taj, on Tuesday, Aug. 27, according to Hrana news site.

Kordafshari was sentenced to 15years in prison on charges of “spreading corruption and prostitution and walking without a veil.” She received 1.5 years in prison on charges of “propaganda against the system” and 7.5 years for “collusion against national security.”

Korkdafashari has been under arrest in Tehran’s notorious Evin prison since June 1.

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Tehran’s head of revolutionary court said women who send Masih Alinejad videos risk jail sentence up to 10 years of jail.

This is part of regime’s campaign intimidation to control women and impose its bad laws. The regime is scared of the women who have embarked on a campaign of civil disobedience. I’ll keep going and spread the voices of people as long as I keep receiving videos

Yasaman Aryani, who was arrested and detained since April has been beaten up in Qarchak prison, according to sources close to the family. Islamic Republic judiciary is deliberately incarcerating activists and political dissidents along with those convicted of violent and drug-related crimes.
Raheleh Ahmadi, Saba Kord Afshari’s mother, was arrested by security forces on July 9, 2019. According to their family, she is arrested to put pressure on her detained daughter who has denied giving forced video confessions. Ahmadi was taken to a court where her accusations were explained as “propaganda against the state”, “collaboration with foreign media”, and “encouraging corruption and prostitution”. She was then transferred to the Qarchak prison. However, as of now, her whereabouts are unknown.

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